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The 36 Best Walks and Hikes in Tasmania

February 09, 2022 32 min read 1 Comment

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The Best Walks and Hikes in Tasmania

Best Walks and Hikes in Tasmania: A Comprehensive Guide for Every Type of Adventurer

Tasmania is known for its natural beauty and mountains with an abundance of walking and hiking trails that are perfect for people who love the outdoors. Some of the most notable hikes include the Cradle Mountain Hike, the Overland Track, and Mount Wellington Hike. These hikes have stunning views of the surrounding landscape, and it is a great way to enjoy nature in its purest form. To help you find the best walk or hike for you, we have grouped the best walks and hikes into categories, including treks for Nature Lovers, History Buffs, Kid-friendly, Mountains and waterfalls and multi-day hikes.

Use the Table of Contents below to jump to hikes suited to you.

The best walks and hikes in Tasmania

Table of Contents

What is the Best Way to Explore Tasmania?
Do I need a National Parks Pass for Tasmania?       

Best Walks and Hikes for Nature Lovers in Tasmania   
The Evercreech Falls & White Knights Walk - Mathinna   
Painted Cliffs Walk – Maria Island   
The Nut Walk - Stanley         
Crater Lake Circuit Walk – Cradle Mountain           
Dove Lake Circuit Walk – Cradle Mountain
Cape Hauy Walk - Fortescue
Cape Raoul Hike – Cape Raoul         
Mount Amos – Coles Bay & Freycinet National Park         
The Tarkine / Takayna – North West Tasmania
The Neck – Bruny Island       

Best Walks and Hikes for History Buffs in Tasmania     
Coal Mines Historic Walk - Saltwater River
Fossil Cliffs – Maria Island
Port Arthur Historic Site – Port Arthur         
Stanley Heritage Walk – Stanley     
Battery Point Heritage Walk – Hobart         
Richmond Village Heritage Walk – Richmond       
King Island's Maritime Trails – King Island 

Best Kid-friendly Walks and Hikes in Tasmania            
Goblin Forest Walk – St Helens
Creepy Crawly Nature Trail – Southwest National Park
Tamar Island / Tamar Wetlands – Riverside
Remarkable Cave – Port Arthur
Bay of Fires Conservation Area – The Gardens
Springlawn Nature Walk – Bakers Beach
Cataract Gorge Reserve – West Launceston
Enchanted Walk – Cradle Mountain

Best Mountain and Waterfall Walks and Hikes in Tasmania   
Montezuma Falls Track – Roseberry
Russell Falls – Mount Field National Park
Three Falls Circuit (Horseshoe Falls and Lady Barron Falls) – Mount Field National Park
Organ Pipes Circuit / Wellington Park – Kunanyi / Mount Wellington, Hobart
Myrtle Falls – Wellington Park
Hogarth Falls – Strahan
St Columba Falls – Pyengana
Ralph Falls – Ringarooma
Tasman Arch Walk – Eaglehawk Neck
Hastings Caves & Thermal Springs – Hastings
Mole Creek Caves – Mayberry

What is the Best Way to Explore Tasmania?

Tasmania may be Australia’s smallest state (the size of Ireland and a population of just over 540,000 people), yet its separation from mainland Australia by the Bass Strait means that the diverse environments are relatively untouched. Nearly 40% of all Tasmanian land is protected, with 19 National Parks (many on the UNESCO World Heritage List) and a diverse range of environments; from reefs, atolls, sand dune coastlines and high lake covered plateaus to rugged mountains, high lake covered plateaus, lowland plains, valleys and grasslands as well as tall evergreen eucalypt forests, alpine heathlands and temperate rainforests.

Tasmania was originally inhabited by Indigenous Australians until European settlers arrived in 1803, which led to many species becoming extinct or endangered and the landscape becoming colonised. The Tasmanian government has made it their mission to protect all species, so there are now strict laws in place to prevent any more species from becoming extinct and the continued preservation of the natural landscape.

As you might expect, Tasmania is not public transport friendly, and to get around this beautiful state and explore all the incredible walks and hikes on offer; you need to do it by car. The good news is that most of the walks and hikes can be reached and completed as a single day trip, with only the price of petrol limiting how far you explore.

Wombat at Cradle Mountain
Insider tip:

Plan for some walks at dusk to see some of Tassie's nocturnal wildlife

- Marc @ Auski

Do I need a National Parks Pass for Tasmania?

The short answer is yes, a valid park pass is required to visit all National Parks in Tasmania. A variety of national park passes are available, allowing you to choose the best method to see Tasmania's world-class national parks that suits you. You don't need a park pass if you’re just visiting state parks and reserves. If you’re on holiday in Tasmania, a few different passes are available, depending on your itinerary.

Daily passes are available, granting access to national parks for 24 hours. Cradle Mountain requires a separate daily pass, obtained at the Cradle Mountain Visitor Centre. A 2-month Holiday Passes offers admission to all national parks and the use of the Cradle Mountain shuttle bus.

Want to go to any park whenever it's convenient for you? Then the best option might be an annual or two-year All Parks Pass. This pass is popular for Tasmanian residents and those spending months travelling around Tasmania. This pass can track several vehicles as long as they are all registered to the same location. This permit gives you entry to all of Tasmania's national parks, as well as the use of the Cradle Mountain shuttle bus and is a lot more cost-effective. ​You can purchase a Tasmania Parks Pass online. Remember, the weather can change quickly in Tasmania, so when visiting a national park in Tasmania, be sure to check in with a park ranger to get tailored advice on weather forecasts and the walk/hike intensity.

Tasmania National Parks Pass Cost

Daily Pass - up to 24 hours, excludes Cradle Mountain

Per vehicle (up to 8 people)

$40.00

Per person (under five years no charge)

$20.00

Icon ​Daily Pass - Cradle Mountain only (includes shuttle service)

Adults (18 years and over)

$25.00

 

Children (5-17 years, under five years no charge)

$10.00

 

Family (2 adults, 3 children)

$60.00

 

Holiday Passes - up to 2 months (includes Cradle Mountain)

Per vehicle (up to 8 people)

$80.00

Per person (under 5 years no charge)

$40.00

Annual Park Pass - all parks

General

$90.00
$72.00 concession

Seniors - all parks (conditions apply)*

$36.00

Best Walks and Hikes for Nature Lovers in Tasmania

Tasmania has innumerous walks and hikes for nature lovers that offer the opportunity to explore the varied untouched natural landscapes. These are often located in remote areas, away from the city's noise but are definitely worth the day trip.

View of Coles Bay in Tasmania

The Evercreech Falls & White Knights Walk - Mathinna, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 400m/1km circuit
Duration: 10mins/20min circuit
Difficulty: Easy

Evercreech Forest Reserve, located in North-Eastern Tasmania, offers two scenic rainforest treks and excellent free camping opportunities. Both loops are short but incredibly scenic, showing the finest of the region's natural splendour. The Evercreech Falls circle is a little longer, wrapping along the creek and ending at the base of a small rainforest waterfall. The "White Knights of Evercreech" route has five of Australia's largest White Gums, also known as Manna Gums (Eucalyptus viminalis). The giant Eucalypt trees are the tallest of their kind in Australia, reaching heights of over 90 metres tall, with some of the older ones dating back over 300 years. While the walk is only 400m, adults and older children may prefer the longer Evercreech Falls trek. If you want to stay longer, you can trek to Evercreech Falls, near the South Esk River, and the picnic amenities are excellent, with a large underground shelter, tables, and grills, so pack the car for a picnic after the walk.

Evercreech Falls and White Knights walk in Tasmania

Painted Cliffs Walk – Maria Island, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 4.3km return
Duration: 1.5-2.5 hours return
Difficulty: Moderate (tracks may have short steep hill sections, a rough surface and many steps.)

Once you reach the Painted Cliffs, this relaxing coastal walk on Maria Island transforms into a breathtaking experience. The Painted Cliffs are built of Triassic sandstone, which formed 200-250 million years ago when enormous rivers deposited extensive layers of sand across broad flood basins. Over time, this sand was compacted to form the soft rock we see today. The iron oxide patterning was formed considerably more recently, during the last 10 million years, during a monsoonal environment in Tasmania.

These sandstone cliffs make up for their lack of height with vibrant colours and whirling patterns. The erosion has been accelerated by wave action and sea spray, resulting in magnificent honeycomb patterns, potholes, and notches. The best time to see the Painted Cliffs is two hours before low tide. Unfortunately, there is no way to see the Painted Cliffs from the clifftop. Tidal information is accessible at the Maria Island Gateway during ferry check-in or via the QR code displayed on the Noticeboards at the Visitor Information Centre or the Maria Island Rangers Station. While you’re in the area, Hopground Beach is a great place to unwind, with the Maria Island Marine Reserve offering opportunities to swim, snorkel, and explore the rockpools. Bicycles are permitted to be ridden on designated road segments but not on beaches or walking paths.

The cliffs are lovely and intriguing during the day. Still, when the evening light strikes the pale sandstone, warming it to rich buttery golden colours and creating a photographer's paradise, they come into their own.

Painted Cliffs Walk, Maria Island, Tasmania

Photo by Joe Cabahug IG

The Nut Walk - Stanley, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 4.6km circuit
Duration: 1 hr circuit
Difficulty: Moderate (well maintained, but a little steep)

Ascend the 143 meter-high volcanic plug (the walk's highlight) around the plateau and down again. The walk starts via a steep track from Stanley, or you can skip the hard part of the hike and ascend to the top by chairlift.

Climbing the Nut is a rite of passage for Tasmanian hikers. While it may not be the most picturesque walking trail in the state, it is undoubtedly one of the most distinctive. The Nut, the remains of a volcanic neck (created when magma hardened within a vent on an active volcano), rests on the island's border, with a view of the Bass Strait. This hike is relatively straightforward, and highly recommend it if you're visiting Tasmania's northern regions.

The views along the coast and back to the fertile fields and forests of the North-West are spectacular from the top.

The Nut, walk and hike and Stanley Tasmania

Photo by Tripinaram IG

Crater Lake Circuit Walk – Cradle Mountain, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 5.7km circuit
Duration: 2 hr circuit
Difficulty: Easy - Moderate

Don't be fooled by the name; Crater Lake is the product of glacial ice and snow melting, which hollowed out the crater-like shape we see today. This two-hour circular hike, located near Cradle Mountain, offers beautiful alpine vistas and passes via three separate alpine lakes. Crater Lake is an excellent option for some of the area's more difficult and longer walks and hikes. Even though some bushwalking skill is required and there are a few steep inclines, this trek is ideal for people of all ages and is a fantastic way to see Cradle Mountain, National Park. You’ll pass cascading rivers, wombat burrows and rainforests with plenty of wildlife available for keen eyes.

The route also highlights some beautiful alpine vegetation and provides walkers with an excellent alternative to higher tracks when low clouds and rain are pelting them.

Crater Lake, located halfway along the 5.7-kilometre loop trail, is a classic cirque lake formed when glacial snow and ice carved out a crater-like hollow that is now filled with water. The smaller lakes, Lake Lilla and Wombat Pool, have their own charm. While Cradle Mountain is a 4-hour drive from Hobart, it could be done as a day trip but is best enjoyed as a weekend away with a range of accommodation and camping options available.

Crate Lake Circuit Walk, Cradle Mountain Tasmania

Dove Lake Circuit Walk – Cradle Mountain, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 6km circuit
Duration: 2-3 hrs circuit
Difficulty: Easy

Cradle Mountain is one of Tasmania's most well-known hiking areas and with good reason. Cradle Mountain summit and the Overland Track are among the most prominent Tasmanian hiking trails in this stunning alpine region. But for those after a more leisurely walk with an iconic photo spot in Cradle Mountain, then the Dove Lake Circuit Walk is your go-to. It’s best to walk this circuit in a clockwise direction.

This easy day walk in Cradle Country is a lakeside loop walk that takes you around the lake and through the lush alpine rainforest, with great views of the surrounding hills. This 6-kilometre trail is unquestionably one of Tasmania's best. The trek begins at Dove Lake, a glacially sculpted lake located just beneath Cradle Summit, and provides both close and majestic views of the famed mountain. The trail winds its way around Dove Lake, beneath the mountain, and back to the starting point through lush rainforest and some of Tasmania's unique vegetation.

Dove lake circuit walk, Cradle Mountain, Tasmania

Cape Hauy Walk - Fortescue, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 9.4km return
Duration: 4 hrs circuit
Difficulty: Moderate

The Cape Hauy walk, starting at Fortescue Bay, is a beautiful out-and-back trek to some incredible, jaw-dropping cliffs. The track, part of the Three Capes Track (44.6km taking 2-3 days), begins by undulating through woodlands and heath with many wildflowers. The path then descends a steep set of stone steps before returning to the cape. Before arriving at the beautiful vistas of steep cliffs and rock formations, the walk passes through a mix of heath and woods. Cape Hauy juts out into the Tasman sea with views on both sides. The cape is surrounded by stunning dolerite columns that plummet into the sea. Seabirds, eagles, and even passing whales can be snapped with a camera or spotted with binoculars.
Climbing and abseiling are popular at Cape Hauy's stunning dolerite columns and cliffs. Climbers use the sea stacks, the "Candlestick", and the "Totem Pole" near Cape Hauy, and you may spot them on your walk. If you want to skip the 9.4km walk, you can see Cape Hauy from the Tasman National park by detouring along Arthur Highway to the Pirates Bay overlook near Eaglehawk Neck.

Cape Hauy Walk, Fortescue, Tasmania

Cape Raoul Hike – Cape Raoul, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 16km return (18km including Shipstern Bluff Walk)
Duration: 5 hrs circuit
Difficulty: Moderate

You'll find a wealth of magnificent Tasmanian coastal hiking routes if you visit the wild Tasman Peninsula. The Cape Raoul Track, a somewhat long but gorgeous trek leading to the often-overlooked Third Cape, is one of our personal favourites (we absolutely love the Tasman Peninsula!). The Cape Raoul hike begins with a gentle rise through eucalypt forest before descending to the vast plateau that stretches to Cape Raoul overlooking the Tasman Sea. Hikers will also have the option of taking a short detour to a viewpoint overlooking Shipstern Bluff, one of the world's most famous big-wave surf breaks, and it’s picture-perfect around sunset!

The Cape Raoul Hike is certainly breathtaking, with the hike ascending to a cliff edge, which may startle some hikers. The dolerite cape plunges into the sea with a stunning drop. On the rocks and small islands below, it's pretty common to spot seals. ​

Cape Raoul Hike, Cape Raoul, Tasmania

Mount Amos – Coles Bay & Freycinet National Park

Hiking Distance: 4km return
Duration: 2-3 hours return
Difficulty: Moderate (some scrambling required, some tracks steep and rough)

Mount Amos is part of the Hazards, a group of granite mountains that tower over Coles Bay and Freycinet National Park. Mount Amos, located in Freycinet National Park, is widely regarded as one of Australia's most beautiful summit views. The peak offers panoramic views of Wineglass Bay and the Freycinet Peninsula, a Jurassic environment that will leave you amazed. Although the climb to the top isn't particularly long, it does require some rock and boulder scrambling as some sections of the hike are steep and rough. If you’re staying in the region, making the extra effort to travel up to Mt Amos for sunrise is strongly recommended, and you will be rewarded with spectacular vistas.

This trek is not suitable for the elderly or children under the age of ten. The track climbs sharply over exposed rock sheets and can be treacherous, especially after rain. Walkers should wear sturdy walking shoes or boots. This track should be approached with caution. There are restroom facilities at the car park, with none along the trail.

Mt Amos, Mount Amos in Coles Bay and Freycinet National Park

The Tarkine / Takayna – North West Tasmania

Hiking Distance: various
Duration: Various
Difficulty: Easy - Moderate

The Tarkine, also known as the Takanya, is Australia's largest temperate rainforest and the world's second-largest cool temperate rainforest delivering an incredible experience. It's a wild, damp, and undoubtedly beautiful place that's on the verge of extinction! At the expense of this rich, biodiverse global treasure, logging and mining businesses are developing throughout the region. The stronger the urge to explore the region responsibly will help to strengthen the movement to protect it.

Much of north-western Tasmania is referred to as Tarkine or Takayna by its Aboriginal name, which runs from just south of Smithton to north of Queenstown. Rainforests and rivers, high mountains, and natural coasts characterise this region. Currently, it is unprotected. It's not a national park, and it's not part of Tasmania's adjacent Wilderness World Heritage. Many people are working to correct this to conserve the land for future generations.

We recommend you grab a copy of ‘ Tarkine Trails / takayna makuminya’by Phill Pullinger and Bob Brown Foundation, which is the definitive guide to adventurers to the Tarkine and head out to experience this incredible place.

The Tarkine / Takayna – North West Tasmania

The Neck – Bruny Island, Tasmania (Truganini - The Neck Game Reserve Lookout)

Hiking Distance: 279 steps
Duration: 20mins return
Difficulty: Easy

Yet another of the Auski teams favourite spots is the incredible Bruny Island. A trip to the Bruny Islands’ Neck is guaranteed to be a delight, not least because of the spectacular views but also because it is home to short-tailed shearwater and tiny penguin colonies. Bruny Island Neck is a land isthmus (a narrow strip of land that connects two larger landmasses and separates two bodies of water) in southern Tasmania that joins north and south Bruny Island. Bruny Island is Tasmania's fourth-largest island and a popular tourism destination for locals and visitors. Visitors and photographers from all over the world are stunned by the Neck's jaw-dropping 360-degree views, making it one of the most recognisable and photographed places in Tasmania.

The Neck overlook is reached via 279 timber steps, where you can take in not only the breathtaking surroundings but also natural species during the warmer months of September to February. Short-tailed Shearwaters and small penguins use the Neck as a breeding ground, and you can see them returning to their tunnels in the sand dunes at dusk during the summer months. At dusk during these peak hours, a Parks and Wildlife interpretation guide is present. At other times, guests can use the interpretation board to learn more. You can also access a timber boardwalk across the Neck to the beach on the opposite side; just remember to stay on the boardwalk as much as possible to avoid disturbing the local wildlife.

Make sure to look out for the monument to the Aboriginal woman Truganini which is also be found on the Neck. This plaque honours the Nuenonne and Truganini tribes who lived on Lunnawannalonna (Bruny Island) before European arrival. Truganini was the daughter of a Bruny Island chief who fought tirelessly throughout her life to bring Tasmania's indigenous communities together.

The Neck – Bruny Island, Tasmania (Truganini - The Neck Game Reserve Lookout)

Best Walks and Hikes for History Buffs in Tasmania

History buffs will be delighted to know that there are many walks and hikes that can take them on a journey of discovery throughout Tasmania. One of the best ways to learn about the history and heritage of a place is by walking and hiking. These activities allow you to experience the past and feel like you’re walking in the footsteps of your ancestors. Tasmania is an inspiring location with a rich cultural heritage. If you're planning to visit the island, history buffs looking for a good walk or hike should consider the following hikes in Tasmania.

Visiting Port Arthur Historic Site in Tasmania
Coal Mines Historic Walk, Saltwater River, Tasmania

Photo by Jules Witek IG

Coal Mines Historic Walk - Saltwater River, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 2km
Duration: 1-2 hours return
Difficulty: Easy

Located in the Tasman Peninsula, The Coal Mines Historic Site is a wonderful place to explore the history of Tasmania. As you explore the trails and tracks surrounding the Site and read the stories of some of the people who lived and worked here, you will learn about the history of this site. The Coal Historic Site provides for 3 walking routes; the Settlement to the Mineshaft (2hrs), the Main Shaft to the Settlement (1.2hrs) or the Settlement to Plunkett Point (50mins). This walk allows you to explore the remnants of the village, which formerly had stone prisoner barracks and punishment cells, a chapel, bakehouse, and shop, as well as commanding officer, surgeon, and military quarters.

The beauty and tranquillity of the walk contrasts with the site's history, once home to brutal, unrelenting convict labour. The picturesque location, which overlooks Ironstone Bay's shallow waters, is mostly in ruins. Parts of the penitentiary, underground cells, and mineshaft remain, while minor interpretative clues betray the past of coal mining and captivity. These are distributed over the property like blocks, making the leisurely stroll suitable for slow exploration. Pack a picnic lunch and plenty of water to provide time to relax and reflect on the site's history.

Fossil Cliffs Walk, Fossil Cliffs – Maria Island, Tasmania

Fossil Cliffs – Maria Island, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 2km
Duration: 1-2 hours return
Difficulty: Easy

Maria Island is a paradise for walks, and this spectacular cliff face walk on Maria Island is steeped in both ancient and modern legends – it also happens to be the most visually striking location on the island. Whilst the Painted Cliffs (mentioned above) can be accessed dependent on tides, the Fossil Cliffs can be accessed at any time and are great for young and old – especially kids! The stunning cliff edge is reached through an easy walk adjacent to the grass airfield. A short steep trail leads to a rock ledge where you can get an up-close look at the cliff's rock strata. The cliffs contain many fossils deposited in the water around 300 million years ago, including clams, sea fans, corals, scallop shells, and sea lilies. The Fossil Cliffs, which reach heights of over 100 metres and plunge straight into the sea, are home to some of the most abundant and well-preserved fossils in Tasmania and is one of the best examples of its sort anywhere on the planet. Even if you're not very interested in geology or fossils in general, it's impossible not to be awestruck when strolling over a cliff composed entirely of old shells. There is a flat region in the middle of the cliffs where you can find and investigate many rocks and fossils. You can access the Fossil Cliffs via bicycle, but not on the fossil platform. Restrooms and facilities are located in the Darlington township.

Port Arthur Walks, Port Arthur Historic Site – Port Arthur, Tasmania

Photo by Meg Soutar IG

Port Arthur Historic Site – Port Arthur, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 2.4km
Duration: 1-2 hours
Difficulty: Easy

This ultimate list of walks in Tasmania would not be complete without the Port Arthur Historic Site. The Port Arthur Historic Site was a 19th-century convict settlement that is now an open-air museum on the Tasman Peninsula. The massive penitentiary and the preserved shell of the Convict Church, erected by inmates, are among the numerous ruins you can explore.

Whilst the entry is $45 for adults and $20 for children, the day pass is valid for 2 consecutive days and includes a 40-minute introductory walking tour and a 20-minute harbour cruise which you can enjoy before or after exploring the area on your own. If you’re a fan of the supernatural, trust us, and book yourself on the Ghost tours at night!

Stanley Heritage Walk – Stanley, Tasmania

Photo by Lisa IG

Stanley Heritage Walk – Stanley, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 2.5km
Duration: 1 hour
Difficulty: Easy

The Stanley Heritage Walk is an interactive, multilingual self-guided tour and walk that guides visitors to Stanley's most historic sites, providing a rare behind-the-scenes glimpse into one of Australia's most treasured fishing villages. It is accessible via smartphones and other internet-enabled devices. The walk explores 15 historic locations in Stanley, and it is recommended to begin at Marine Park.

Discreet interpretive signs placed throughout the town designate the tour's halting spots, briefly describing each unique landmark. The stroll includes fifteen historic places throughout Stanley, as viewed through the eyes of Mrs. Meg Eldridge, one of Stanley's most cherished inhabitants. Stanley has a long and illustrious history, and it's terrific to be able to share it in such a modern and accessible manner. This is an excellent resource for visitors to the area and local history buffs. The walk includes some of Stanley’s most famous landmarks. Despite their prominence, not everyone is familiar with the stories that surround them, and this route makes their history more accessible than ever before. The free self-guided tour takes a little over an hour, or you can go at your own pace. The Stanley Visitor Information Centre has a hard copy map and guide in booklet form for individuals without internet access.

Battery Point Heritage Walk – Hobart, Tasmania

Battery Point Heritage Walk – Hobart, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 3km
Duration: 1.5 hours
Difficulty: Easy

Battery Point was established in the early 1800s during the early days of Hobart Town. It has kept the winding lanes, colonial architecture, and historical ambience that make it one of Australia's most fascinating historic zones.

It has become one of Hobart's most popular neighbourhoods, built on a spit of land jutting into the Derwent River while maintaining historical ties to Hobart and Tasmania. Many of the original colonial cottages from Hobart's earliest days can still be found here. Besides the walk, there are also several beautiful parks, cafes, and other attractions to see along the way.

While you can explore Battery Point any way you want, we recommend the Battery Point Walk, also known as In Bobby’s Footsteps, which is a self-guided tour you can access via your phone. The stroll offers you a behind-the-scenes look at how people lived during colonial colonisation and how we got to where we are now. You’ll notice signs that convey the story of the locations across time, taking you to 16 different destinations. Although you can pick and choose which locations to visit, attempt the whole walk starting at the bottom of Montpelier Retreat. The walk takes you along laneways, through old sailors' cottages, and throughout the historic precinct with essentially untouched exteriors and streetscapes since it was erected.

Richmond Bridge, Richmond Village Heritage Walk – Richmond, Tasmania

Richmond Village Heritage Walk – Richmond, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 2.2km
Duration: 1 hour
Difficulty: Easy

Richmond, only 30 minutes from Hobart's city centre, is a great day trip for anyone visiting the south.

This heritage walk allows you to explore Richmond, a 19th-century Georgian community rich in convict history, and visit some of the village's most significant historic sites. This 2.2km walk is recommended to start at the Richmond Bridge, Australia’s oldest bridge built by convicts in 1823, and is also dog-friendly, allowing you to grab your 4-legged best friend and their leash and get exploring. Finish your walk with a picnic on the riverbank or in one of the local cafes or beer gardens. The Richmond Gaol and Historic Site and the beautifully Village Green are also worthwhile seeing.

King Island's ​Maritime Trails – King Island, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: various
Duration: various
Difficulty: Easy – Moderate

King Island is a hiker’s delight, especially for those interested in maritime history – but hiking to shipwrecks is fun for all! While King Island's ​Maritime Trails isn’t one specific walk, there are a collection of trails covering 8 shipwrecks, 3 bays and 2 lighthouses. One of the most notable is the Cataraqui, which became shipwrecked in 1845 with only 9 out of the 410 passengers surviving, becoming stranded on King Island for 5 weeks. The Neva sank on the north-western tip of the island ten years before, killing nearly 200 women and children. Not every accident resulted in such a devastating loss of life. In 1866, the Netherby sank with 504 people on board, and no one was killed.  

The King Island Maritime Trail was established in 2001 and includes interpretative markers near many of the most famous wrecks off the coast. It’s best to stay a few days and explore everything King Island has to offer!

Best Kid-friendly Walks and Hikes in Tasmania

Tasmania is vast and wild, and many of the incredible walks and hikes are not suitable for kids due to the length or the terrain. There is still a range of great walks and trails that are certain to captivate and entertain kids throughout the state.  

Best Kid-friendly Walks and Hikes in Tasmania

Fossil Cliffs – Maria Island, Tasmania

See above, under walks for History Buffs.

Dove Lake Circuit Walk – Cradle Mountain, Tasmania

See above, under walks for Nature Lovers

 

Goblin Forest Walk – St Helens, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 400m circuit
Duration: 20 min circuit
Difficulty: Easy

This 20-minute circuit through the north-eastern rainforest in St Helens is so simple that you can even show it to toddlers in prams. When tiny kids learn about Goblin Forest Walk, their eyes will likely light up. This short, 400-meter circle walk takes tourists through some lovely rainforest that is rapidly recovering from the effects of mining. The Goblin Forest Walk is a short, pleasant, and wheelchair-friendly walk that begins at the Poimena parking park; feel free to embellish stories and encourage the kids to keep their eyes open for goblins.

Other trails in the Blue Tier area provide a variety of experiences, durations, and levels of challenge for both hikers and mountain bike riders.

Goblin Forest Walk – St Helens, Tasmania

Photo by Olivia IG

Creepy Crawly Nature Trail – Southwest National Park, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 1km
Duration: 30mins return
Difficulty: Easy

This one is for all the insect enthusiasts! Take a stroll in a beautiful cold temperate rainforest in one of the state’s lush National Parks. The fully boarded track winds its way softly around moss-covered trees and over massive logs. The trail is not suggested for those who cannot climb a large number of stairs or bend down and duck beneath branches. The 30-minute Creepy Crawly Nature Trail on the outskirts of Southwest National Park will pique the interest of young bug enthusiasts. In this chilly, moist rainforest, wriggly animals are abound, and there are informational displays about the local fauna and vegetation.

Creepy Crawly Nature Trail – Southwest National Park, Tasmania

Tamar Island / Tamar Wetlands – Riverside, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 4km return
Duration: 1.5 hrs
Difficulty: Easy

A unique estuary wetland environment of mudflats, lagoons, and islands can be found only 10 minutes away from the outskirts of Launceston. The Tamar Island Wetlands, rich in plant and animal life, are a stunning Tasmanian environment and a sanctuary for various birds, mammals, reptiles, frogs, fish, and invertebrates.

Wandering along the accessible boardwalk, lined by tall native Tasmanian grass species as it traverses the wetlands, is the finest way to explore the wetlands. The wetlands, located in the Tamar Conservation Area, are a fantastic place to watch the Tasmanian birdlife, with over 60 species identified in the area. Ducks, black swans, egrets, cormorants, and swamp harriers, as well as occasional visitors like the white-bellied sea eagle and northern hemisphere migrations like the common greenshank, can all be found here. The Wetlands Centre is run by Wildcare volunteers who provide visitor services 364 days a year. Head to the 7-hectare Tamar Island via the wheelchair- and stroller-friendly boardwalk.

Tamar Island / Tamar Wetlands – Riverside, Tasmania

Remarkable Cave – Port Arthur, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 400m (115 steps)
Duration: 15 mins return
Difficulty: Easy – Moderate

Remarkable Cave is 12 kilometres south of Port Arthur on the Tasman Peninsula's southern coast and a great place to stop if exploring the peninsula or visiting the Port Arthur Historic Site. It's a short, easy walk from the car park to the huge viewing platform, which offers spectacular views of Penguin Rocks and the bay. This stunning shoreline is created by wild waves pounding against the coastal rock below. You might catch a glimpse of a local sea eagle swooping high above you or a migrating whale. To see the aptly called Remarkable Cave, descend the 115 steps where the cave will be visible from the custom-designed platform at the bottom, encircled by sheer, old sandstone cliffs. Before descending the steps to the beautiful Remarkable Cave, take in the view of the craggy southern coastline from Maignon Bay Lookout. The waves surge through the tunnel at particular periods of the year, producing a spectacular spectacle for those fortunate enough to see it. Prepare to get a little drenched!

Remarkable Cave is notable not just for its unusual shape but also because its opening resembles the shape of Tasmania when viewed from the viewing platform. Unlike most sea caves, Remarkable Cave has two ocean-facing openings formed by erosion along cracks caused by major ancient earthquakes. Remarkable Caves is well-known for its scenic, immersive experience, which is especially popular with visitors waiting for low tide to go inside the cave and onto the beach.

Remarkable Cave – Port Arthur, Tasmania

Photo by Meg Soutar IG

Bay of Fires Conservation Area – The Gardens, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: Various
Duration: Various
Difficulty: Easy

The Bay of Fires is one of Tasmania's most popular conservation reserves, known for its crystal-clear waters, white-sand beaches, and orange lichen-covered granite boulders. The Bay of Fires is designated one of the world's 'Most Beautiful Beaches' by Lonely Planet, and there's no doubt it lives up to its name. The Bay of Fires conservation area stretches along the coast from Binalong Bay in the south to Eddystone Point in the north. There is 50 kilometres to choose from to explore, whether you want to spend five minutes or five hours chasing sea eagles, studying bright-orange lichen on stones, or getting your feet wet in the turquoise water. Keep an eye out for dolphins right off the coast!

Captain Tobias Furneaux noticed Aboriginal fires when he sailed past in 1773, but the name could allude to the beautiful orange lichen that grows on the granite stones that line the bay. Anson's Bay divides the conservation area into three portions, with Anson's Bay separating the southern and northern ends. Driving down the shore to The Gardens provides a lovely view of the water. The Bay of Fires has several rocky slopes to explore and many small hidden beaches and inlets. Binalong Bay is the area's primary beach, a lovely stretch of white sand with crystal blue water ideal for swimming, snorkelling, surfing, or simply relaxing. There's also a lot of local wildlife to see, such as birds, which may be seen on self-directed and guided hikes. With multiple boat ramps, the area is known for its game fishing. Divers and snorkelers go to the offshore reefs because of the rich marine biodiversity.

The Bay of Fires is one of Tasmania's most beautiful and secluded beaches, perfect for long leisurely walks, swimming in protected bays, fishing off the rocks, and quiet coastal camping nestled behind the dunes. You'll be left wondering how you'll ever motivate yourself to leave this pocket of paradise!

Bay of Fires, Bay of Fires Conservation Area – The Gardens, Tasmania

Photo by Ruth IG

Springlawn Nature Walk – Bakers Beach, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 4km circuit
Duration: 2 hrs circuit
Difficulty: Easy

Because there is so much wildlife to observe, Narawntapu National Park on the north coast is often referred to as Tasmania's Serengeti. On the simple, gorgeous two-hour Springlawn Nature Walk, you'll see everything from kangaroos to black swans hanging out at the lagoon. Starting at the Springlawn Visitor Centre, this simple walk around the lagoon, passing through open grasslands and coastal vegetation on your way to the lagoon bird hide, before returning along calm boardwalks and dunes. As you follow the southern side of the lagoon, the open grasslands section of the track is unmarked. At dusk, the nature walk area is the best place to see a forester kangaroo, Bennetts wallaby, Tasmanian Pademelon and the occasional wombat.

The bird hide is located in the lagoon's paperbark forest and is an excellent site for birdwatching and photography. Brown falcons, swamp harriers, and white-bellied sea eagles may be seen hunting for prey overhead. At the start of the walk, at the Springlawn Visitor Centre and campsite, there are restrooms, picnic tables, and barbeque grills. These facilities are wheelchair accessible, although the walk is not because certain areas are sand dunes. ​

Springlawn Nature Walk – Bakers Beach, Narawntapu National Park, Tasmania

Cataract Gorge Reserve – West Launceston, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: various
Duration: 2-3 hours
Difficulty: Easy

In the middle of Tasmania's second-largest city, Cataract Gorge is a true wilderness region. The walk will take about 2 or 3 hours at a moderate pace, depending on how long you stay at various sites. It's rare to come across a wilderness region near a city. The chairlift at the First Basin that traverses the Gorge is the world's longest single-span chairlift, having been built in 1972 and definitely worth checking out. Cataract Gorge has something for everyone, whether it's a stroll through the gardens, the easy Cataract Hike along the gorge's northern cliffs or the more adventurous, 90-minute Duck Reach walk to the south. The Duck Reach walk continues up the river's eastern bank, then lowers to a new bridge, which it traverses to reach the historic Duck Reach power station. From 1895 to 1955, the station, one of the world's first hydroelectric power plants, was in operation. Return on the same path as before. ​

Cataract Gorge Reserve – West Launceston, Tasmania

Enchanted Walk – Cradle Mountain, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 1.1km circuit
Duration: 20min circuit
Difficulty: Easy

The Enchanted walk lives up to its name and is a short trek that gives you a taste of Cradle Mountain and is appropriate for people of all ages. It begins near the Ranger Station near the Pencil Pine Brook bridge and winds its way through lovely, mossy woodland and along a tumbling creek. On the outskirts of the forest, you might observe pademelons and wombats, and along the track, there is also a tunnel that looks like a wombat burrow that has been erected, and it's a big hit with the kids.

In winter, this walk is often magically blanketed with snow. The trail passes across buttongrass moorland before entering the cold temperate rainforest along Pencil Pine Creek's border. The first half of this walk (before the bridge) is wheelchair accessible; however, there are a few steps beyond the bridge. There are two accessible picnic spots near the visitor centre with protected picnic tables and BBQs. The Dove Lake parking also has handicapped-accessible restrooms.

Enchanted Walk – Cradle Mountain, Tasmania

Photo by Leah Gatto IG

Best Mountain and Waterfall Walks and Hikes in Tasmania

Tasmania’s unique wilderness is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and offers some of the most magnificent natural attractions in the world, from icy mountain peaks to renowned white-sand beaches. So it’s no surprise that t some of Australia's best waterfalls may be found right here in Tasmania! To complement the list of waterfalls, we’ve also added in some mountain walks and hikes to create the best guide to exploring the mountainous regions of Tasmania.

Best Mountain hikes in Tasmania and best waterfalls in Tasmania
Montezuma Falls, Montezuma Falls Track – Roseberry, Tasmania

Montezuma Falls Track – Roseberry, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 11.5km return
Duration: 3 hrs
Difficulty: Easy

You'd think a waterfall named for a great Aztec emperor would be spectacular, and you'd be right! Montezuma Falls is Tasmania's highest permanent waterfall. This amazing, sleepy monster can be found on Tasmania's Wild West Coast and reached through a short but beautiful forest trail. Montezuma Falls is a multi-tiered waterfall located at the end of a 1.5-hour easy forest climb along an old tramway through damp, mountainous, densely forested west coastland. It's astonishing to think about how they managed to construct a tramway here. Although "Sustainable Timber Tasmania" (previously Forestry Tasmania) manages the area, it is available to the public. Unfortunately, the rivers and creeks in the Rosebery area are poisoned with heavy metals and unsafe to drink due to their long mining history. The trail eventually leads to the base of the 104-meter-high waterfall, as well as a bridge with spectacular views of the falls and the untamed western rainforests. Return on the same path as before.

Russell Falls – Mount Field National Park, Tasmania

Photo by Lisa IG

Russell Falls – Mount Field National Park, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 1.4km
Duration: 25mins return
Difficulty: Easy

Russell Falls is at the top of the list of family-friendly short treks, and with good reason. As one of Tasmania’s most treasured places, this lovely waterfall is a 15-minute walk from the Mount Field National Park Visitor Centre and takes you through a lush, green rainforest setting. With incredible geology and forests, take a few deep breaths and bask in its awe-inspiring beauty. Return the same way or take the loop trail back on the other side of the fern-filled brook when it's time to depart. When you go back to the Visitor Centre, stop by Waterfalls Café for a cup of coffee. If you go after dark, you might be able to witness the local glow worms in the Glow Worm Grotto. At dusk, in the creek, you might even be able to see an elusive platypus. If you want to continue your walk, see the Three Falls Circuit below.

Three Falls Circuit (Horseshoe Falls and Lady Barron Falls) – Mount Field National Park, Tasmania

Three Falls Circuit (Horseshoe Falls and Lady Barron Falls) – Mount Field National Park, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 6km circuit
Duration: 2.5hrs
Difficulty: Easy - Moderate

If you visit Russell Falls, you can continue on for more local stunning falls via the 6km Three Falls circuit hike. The Three Falls circuit will take you through beautiful rainforests full of swamp gums, the world's tallest blooming plant, before arriving at Horseshoe Falls and Lady Barron Falls. This 6-kilometre circle includes Russell Falls and some of the park's other natural highlights. Most people travel the circuit in the opposite direction, starting with the short walk to Russell Falls and then descending to the stunning Horseshoe Falls.

Lady Barron Falls is a charming tiny flowing waterfall that is especially beautiful after it has rained. Like Russell and Horseshoe Falls, Lady Barron Falls is made up of maritime Permian siltstone that is surrounded by retreating sandstone layers. In a thickly forested location where the geology is otherwise covered beneath flora and soils, all three falls provide a peek of the underlying geology. A long flight of wooden steps leads back to the visitor centre at the end of the long loop, where you can also stop for a warm beverage.

Mt Wellington Tasmania, Organ Pipes Circuit / Wellington Park – Kunanyi / Mount Wellington, Hobart, Tasmania

Photo by Dave Scott IG

Organ Pipes Circuit / Wellington Park – Kunanyi / Mount Wellington, Hobart, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 7.4km return
Duration: 3 hrs return
Difficulty: Easy - Moderate

The Organ Pipes Circuit is a great circuit walk close to Hobart that highlights the best bushwalking on Mount Wellington's eastern flank. The walk begins at the Springs and climbs to the Organ Pipes, a set of sheer Dolerite cliffs, before dropping further down the mountain along a path lined with boulder fields and heritage cottages. This is a great day walk for visitors to Hobart and one of Tasmania's Great Short Walks. On this 7.4-kilometre (round-trip) trek, you'll stretch your legs as well as your neck as you stare up at the intimidating "pipes." The underground molten rock cooled and contracted into uniform hexagonal pillars, forming up to 120m high dolerite columns that developed during the Jurassic period, when Tasmania was separating from Antarctica. The Chalet, a rustic stone shelter, marks the finish of the trail. This is a popular spot for climbers to practise their skills. There are numerous steps on this hike, especially climbing up to the Organ Pipes and down to Junction Cabin.

Black glen falls, Myrtle Falls, Tasmania

Myrtle Falls – Wellington Park, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 3.8km
Duration: 1.5 hrs return
Difficulty: Moderate

Myrtle Falls, also known as Black Glen Falls, is one of the best-kept secrets in the Derwent Valley, located south of the town of Lachlan and not far from New Norfolk. These peaceful can be accessed from the Myrtle Forest Picnic Area at the end of Myrtle Forest Road. Myrtle Falls is a 15-minute hike uphill through natural rainforest and towards the Collins Cap and Collins Bonnet mountain ranges. This walk has toilet and picnic facilities, making it ideal for families. Along the walk, there are numerous small waterfalls with two river crossings. There are a few steep areas, slippery rocks, and sections where the trail may not be clear.

If the weather is warm, finish your trek with a refreshing swim in the Lachlan River, right adjacent to the first river crossing on the way back.

Hogarth Falls – Strahan, Tasmania

Photo by Anita IG

Hogarth Falls – Strahan, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 2.4km return
Duration: 45mins return
Difficulty: Easy

Take a walk through Strahan's Peoples Park to the beautiful Hogarth Falls, where you might even see a platypus! This 45-minute return stroll through rainforest trees, including sassafras, leatherwood, and myrtle, will give you a taste of the western wildness. The easy walk through tall forest and rainforest ends at the magnificent waterfall that falls over previously horizontal rocks but have since been skewed nearly vertical. Return via the same trail.

St Columba Falls – Pyengana, Tasmania

Photo by Craig Thomson

St Columba Falls – Pyengana, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 1.2km return
Duration: 30mins return
Difficulty: Easy

A short walk through some of Tasmania's tallest tree ferns leads to one of the state's tallest waterfalls in the northeast. Take a look up! The St Columba Falls are 90 metres tall. It's only a 30-minute drive from St Helens and a 15-minute walk to the falls, but that's the only thing about this experience that's quick. The falls are unquestionably the highlight, as is the hike to the bottom of the waterfall. It takes you through a calm and shady rainforest with some of the world's tallest tree ferns. When you arrive at the lookout, crane your neck to see the South George River flow down in a beautiful series of steep cascades. Return to the top of the hill on the same path.

Ralph Falls – Ringarooma, Tasmania

Photo by Peter Allen IG

Ralph Falls – Ringarooma, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 2.4km return / 4km circuit
Duration: 20 mins return / 50mins circuit
Difficulty: Moderate

At over 90 metres, Ralph Falls is Tasmania's largest single drop waterfall and one of the 60 outstanding short treks on the island state. The trek is a 20-minute walk or a 50-minute circuit if you include the Cash's Gorge loop and is a relaxing stroll through mossy rainforest. This track, which passes near the bluff's edge at points, leads to a lovely lookout above Cash’s Gorge through various plants, including a tea tree forest.

Mt. Victoria Forest Reserve, which has a picnic area, barbeque facilities, and bathrooms, provides access to the waterfall.

Tasman Arch, Tasman Arch Walk – Eaglehawk Neck, Tasmania

Tasman Arch Walk – Eaglehawk Neck, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 0.9km loop
Duration: 15mins
Difficulty: Easy

The peninsula's east coast, just south of the short isthmus at Eaglehawk Neck, offers several easy-to-reach attractions, including Tasman’s Arch and Devils Kitchen (together with neighbouring Fossil Bay Lookout and the Blowhole). The Tasman Arch and Devils Kitchen walk features spectacular wildflowers and is suitable for hikers of all abilities. The route is open year-round and offers a variety of activities. Tasman’s Arch is a tall natural bridge in the sea cliffs, while Devils Kitchen is a deep trench cut out by the Tasman Sea without an arch. Both sights can be seen from overlooks at two different car parks, and you can get even more perspectives by traversing a 0.9-kilometre loop. The Blowhole is a well-known and ruggedly stunning feature on the Tasman Peninsula also worth visiting.

Hastings Caves & Thermal Springs – Hastings, Tasmania

Hastings Caves & Thermal Springs – Hastings, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: 1.2km return
Duration: 45mins
Difficulty: Easy

Bookings must be made prior to your desired cave visit (up to 14 days in advance), and each tour is limited to only 8 individuals. Hastings Caves' magnificent underground realm will show you what lies under Tasmania's gorgeous scenery. Under a lush green forest and ferny glades, the secret of these Tasmanian caves is revealed. The vast dolomite cave system is a maze of rooms lavishly decorated and lit to highlight old underground structures.

Newdegate Cave is Australia's largest dolomite tourist cave when more than 40 million years ago, its huge chambers began to form. Back on the surface, you can unwind in the mineral-rich thermal spring-fed swimming pool (an additional fee of $5 for adults and $2.50 for kids). Year-round, the water temperature of the thermal pool remains at 28 degrees. You can explore the Hastings Caves State Reserve on two easy walking routes, and it’s a great place for a picnic or to have a BBQ with friends and family in the beautiful forest surroundings. Keep a watch out for platypus, quolls, pademelons, and birds, as well as other native creatures that share this forest.

The cave tours last about 45 minutes, and cave tour tickets must be purchased and picked up at the Hastings Cave Visitor Centre. You need to arrive 45 minutes before your tour to give time to purchase or collect tickets, as well as self-drive to the cave car park, which takes about 20 minutes. The cave entrance will be reached after a short trek through the forest. At the designated tour time, the guide will meet you at the cave entrance.

King Solomons Cave Tasmania, Mole Creek Caves – Mayberry, Tasmania

Mole Creek Caves – Mayberry, Tasmania

Hiking Distance: Various
Duration: 45mins
Difficulty: Easy

The environment inside the Mole Creek Caves does not alter from summer to winter, making it a great spot to visit all year round but dress warmly and have comfortable walking shoes because the temperature is 9 degrees.

Mole Creek Caves can only be visited via tours but are definitely worth visiting. Three separate Mole Creek Caves excursions are available, each lasting 45 minutes, and bookings are required 14 days in advance, open year-round except Christmas Day. Marakoopa Cave's Underground Rivers and Glow Worms Tour highlights the lower chamber's brilliant crystals, reflective ponds, stalactites, and stalagmites. This easy excursion is suitable for people of all ages and fitness levels. The Great Cathedral and Glow Worms Tour requires moderate physical fitness to climb the stairwell. As you climb into the Cathedral chamber itself, delicate forms and gorgeous colours greet you, and the excellent natural acoustics amplify voices. The King Solomons Cave Tour is appropriate for people of all ages and fitness levels. The chambers are adorned with shimmering calcite, adding to the cave's spectacular colours and shapes.

The Best Way to Explore Tasmania is by Walking or Hiking

Whether you’re a fan of waterfalls wildlife or are a history buff, with an abundance of walks, trails and hikes in Tasmania, you will never be short of places to visit for adventure. For an extensive list of places to explore, visit the Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service(it’s what we used when we ventured around Tassie looking for amazing places to visit!). Add these walks to your Tasmania bucket list and sign up to our emails for more blogs, news and exclusive offers!

If you’re after any local tips for the slopes or surrounding country towns, or know another great spot that should make the list, send us an email or hit us up on Facebook.


See you out on the trails! ✌🏻


1 Response

Eika
Eika

March 07, 2022

Super helpful blog, definitely plan to visit alot of these!

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